WE'RE ALMOST THERE


16.   Enhancing the finished track

(Figure J)  You have most probably notice that the recording sounds kind of dull.  The final step we need to take it to enhance the audio signal.  This process will expand the high end frequencies, and make the finished  recording sound much cleaner.  To do this, go to the "process" drop down menu, then select "Smooth/Enhance".  You should now have a box like this. 

Figure J

This function has a slider that ranges from -5 to +5.  -5 will take this function into a smoothing process.  This is good for recordings that contain a lot of sibilance.  (high end distortion)  For now though, to enhance our vinyl recording, we're going to select +3.  Click "ok" and have a listen.  If you think it sounds kind of to much into the high end, just do a undo and do this function again.  You can try to do a +1 enhancer.

A final Normalise.

Now that we have finished applying all the necessary processes in restoring our Classic "Nat King Cole" track, we can do a final normalise.  This will amplify the track to its maximum loudness, without distorting any part of the track.  To do this, go to process and then select "Normalise".  Make sure that you have the settings set to 99.20% (-0.07db) and click "ok".  Make sure you have selected "peak level" on the top.    (figure K).  Have a listen!!

YOU HAVE NOW SUCCESSFULLY RECORDED, PROCESSED AND CLEANED UP YOUR FIRST VINYL TRACK FOR CD.   LET'S ENJOY AND PRESERVE THE MUSIC OF A LONG GONE ERA.


Figure K

LP2CD  -  Copying your vinyl to CD
using Sonic Foundry's Sound Forge 6.0.

1.   General Overview. 
2.   Choosing the right soundcard. 
3.   Choosing the right turntable. 
4.   Purchasing a Phono preamp. 
5.   Positioning of equipment. 
6.   Connecting your computer and hi-fi together for duplication. 
7.   Configuring the record and playback controls on Sound-Blaster Value. 
8.   Configuring the record and playback controls on the M Audio Delta 66. 
9.   Recording the sound signal to hard-drive. 
10.   Opening and Configuring Sound Forge for Recording and Playback. 
11.   Starting a recording session. 
12.   Increasing the volume of softer recordings. 
13.  Tidying the beginning and end portions of a sound file. 
14.   Preparing raw vinyl track for CD. 
15.   De-clicking and de-crackling dusty recordings. 
16.   Enhancing the finished track.   


Version 1.2 by Mark Boerebach  -  Updated Tuesday 26th August 2003